When You Want to Buy a House, Who Delivers Your Offer to the Seller?

By Felicia Oliver

Posted on August 26th, 2022

Who Delivers Your Offer? | What to Include in an Offer | What Happens After You Make an Offer? | When Your Offer is Accepted | Can You Back Out After Making An Offer | Can the Seller Back Out?

Illustration of a person buying a home

You’ve found your dream home, and you’ve decided to put in an offer. So, the hard part is over, right? Not necessarily.

The next step is possibly the most critical: Deciding the exact terms of the offer you want to make. This includes the amount you'll offer to pay, plus any contingencies (e.g., inspection, appraisal, or selling your home first, if applicable).

If the offer is too low, particularly in a seller's market, it could be rejected. But if it's too high, you could end up paying more than you need to, and possibly more than you can afford.

Your real estate agent's advice will be crucial during this process. An experienced agent who knows your local area will know the sweet spot that will likely win the seller over and keep the cost you pay for your home within your budget.

Our friends at Clever Real Estate can match you with top-performing real estate agents from Keller Williams, RE/MAX, and other leading brokers to help you find the best expert for your goals. And with Clever Cash Back, buyers in most states can receive up to 0.5% back after closing — putting a little extra money in your pocket to spend on your move, new furnishings, anything you like!

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Who Delivers Your Offer to the Seller?

If you have an agent, your agent will deliver the offer to the seller’s agent— usually via email, but often in person. The seller’s agent will then pass the offer along to the seller, and deliver any response or counteroffer.

If you’re not working with an agent, you’ll deliver your offer to the seller’s agent yourself. If you’re putting in an offer on a for sale by owner (FSBO) property, you’ll give the offer directly to the owner.

What to Include in an Offer: 4 Essential Elements

1. Your Offer Price

For most sellers, the offer price is one of the most important aspects of an offer, if not the most important factor. Your real estate agent can help you decide how you want to approach your offer price

Think about factors like:

  • Your budget
  • The accuracy of the home’s property value
  • Whether you would need to make extensive repairs
  • How much competition you’re likely to have in your market

When you work with an experienced real estate agent, you'll get expert advice from a professional who's assisted many home buyers make strong, winning offers. Your agent will also provide peace of mind by advising you on an offer strategy making sure your offer addresses all the important details that will stand out to a seller.

Our friends at Clever Real Estate work with the best real estate agents in your area — seasoned pros and come from top brokerages like Keller Williams and Coldwell Banker. Clever offers a free service that personally matches you to agents who can help you achieve your home buying goals.

And if you find your agent through Clever, buyers in most states can receive up to 0.5% cash back after closing. For a $400,000 home, that's $2,000 in savings — just for finding a fantastic agent through Clever.

The best way to find an agent AND get cash back!

Our friends at Clever can match you with pre-vetted agents who can help you land your dream home. And in 41 states and Washington D.C., you'll even get 0.5% cash back at closing!


For a $400,000 home sale, that puts $2,000 back in your pocket — just for finding your agent through Clever.

2. Your Proof of Funds

You’ll want a proof of funds letter (or bank statement) that shows you have available funds to pay for all the costs associated with buying, including the mortgage and closing costs. This will assure the seller that you’re a serious, capable buyer.

3. Important Dates

Your offer letter should include the following:

  • A deadline for the seller’s response to your offer
  • The intended closing date
  • The expected closing date on your current home (if applicable)
  • When the seller must vacate the property

Keep in mind, most of these dates are going to be negotiable, and could change.

4. Any Additional Costs and Contingencies

These costs and contingencies are optional, and will depend on what you want, the property you’re trying to buy, and your specific circumstances. Some possibilities include:

  • Inspection Contingency: If you opt for this contingency, it’ll give you the option to walk away from the sale with your earnest money (or negotiate new terms) if the home inspection finds serious problems with the home.
  • Appraisal Contingency: If you opt for this contingency, you’ll be able to walk away from the sale (or renegotiate price) if the home appraisal comes in below the sale price.
  • The Sale of Your Current Home: If your ability to buy the property depends on selling your present home first, this contingency will release you from the sale if you’re unable to sell your current home.

What Happens After You Make an Offer on a House?

Once you officially submit it, the house offer waiting game begins. The seller and their agent will review it. How long do sellers have to respond to an offer? They should respond before the deadline specified in the offer letter, which is usually within 24-48 hours.

But, in a competitive market, they will likely get back to you much faster than that.

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A seller's real estate agent, if a National Association of Realtors (NAR) member, is obligated to present all written offers to the seller, in compliance with the Realtor Code of Ethics. The exception is if the seller gives their agent written permission not to present all offers. That's likely only going to happen if the offer is below a certain threshold that the seller is willing to consider. So if you're genuinely interested in the house, you don't want to provide a lowball offer.

What to Do if You Receive a Counteroffer

If the seller decides to submit a counteroffer, the seller’s agent will deliver it to your agent, and your agent will pass it on to you.

Counteroffers may ask for a higher price, or for concessions like a waived inspection contingency, or negotiations on closing costs. In hot seller’s markets, buyers will often have to make these concessions to secure the property.

At this stage, your agent’s expertise and negotiation skills are going to have a huge impact on how favorable a deal you can work out. That’s why it’s so important to have an experienced agent on your side!

Our friends at Clever Real Estate can connect you with local real estate agents who know your area and have extensive experience assisting home buyers. Clever's matching service is completely free, with no upfront fees or obligation.

🏡 Ready to buy a home?

If you're ready to buy your next home, our friends at Clever can help! Clever will match you with top-rated agents who know how to navigate your local market.


Best of all, buyers in 41 states and Washington D.C. can get 0.5% cash back after closing! That's $2,000 on a $400,000 home purchase, just for finding your agent through Clever.

What Happens if the Buyer Accepts Your Offer on a House?

If both the buyer and the seller sign a purchase agreement, it becomes legally binding. That means you’re now under contract. Congratulations!

From here, if you need financing, you apply for your loan. You may have been pre-approved, but now you're ready to pull all the requested financial documents together for the lender to get the underwriting process underway.

You'll want to get a home inspection to make sure there aren't any hidden issues with the house that could be a deal breaker for you. You'll review the items disclosed in the inspection with your attorney or real estate agent, and negotiate what, if any, repairs the seller will make.

If there are contingencies spelled out in the contract, you want to be on top of the deadlines for meeting them, or of the seller meeting them, should that be the case.

Once the loan has been approved and the money is ready to be transferred to the title company or closing agent, you'll take a final walkthrough of the property. You'll want to have your real estate agent walk through with you, to review and make sure all repairs that were promised have been made and that the home is in its expected condition before taking ownership.

Finally, you'll go to the closing, sign all the legal documents, get the keys and officially become a homeowner!

» Learn What Happens Next: How to Navigate Escrow

Can You Back Out After Making an Offer on a House?

What if you decide you want to back out after making an offer? Buyer’s remorse is real, and second thoughts are natural. A survey from our friends at Clever Real Estate's data center found that 60% of homeowners said they've felt some form of buyer's remorse — up from 35% in 2019.

Before you actually sign the purchase agreement, you can always back out without penalty.

After you sign the purchase agreement, and are officially under contract, it gets more complicated. If there are contingencies in the contract, you could back out if those terms aren’t satisfied; for example, if the inspection discovers a problem in the home. If the contingencies don’t give you an out, you might still be able to back out, if you’re willing to give up your earnest money.

If you’ve signed the purchase agreement, the seller could take you to court to force you to follow through on the purchase, but this is pretty rare.

Can a Seller Back Out of an Accepted Offer?

It’s fairly common for sellers to try to back out of a contract, especially in a hot market where they may have received a higher offer. But it’s very difficult to do so, since contracts are written to protect buyers.

The seller may be able to back out if the buyer has breached the terms of the contract by missing a deadline or a deposit, if they can prove the buyer committed fraud, or if they have an out through a contingency. The seller could also try to directly persuade the buyer to cancel the contract.

Outside of those reasons, it’s difficult for a seller to back out of a signed contract. The buyer can sue them for breach of contract, and the seller would probably lose and be forced to complete the sale. They may also have to pay the buyer’s legal fees, expenses, and even lost equity.

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FAQs

Does a real estate agent have to present all offers?

A seller's real estate agent, if a National Association of Realtors (NAR) member, is obligated to present all written offers to the seller, in compliance with the Realtor Code of Ethics. The exception is if the seller gives their agent written permission not to present all offers. Learn more about whether an agent has to present all offers to sellers.

How long does it take for a seller to accept an offer?

The seller should respond before the deadline specified in the offer letter, which is usually within 24-48 hours. Learn more about how long it takes for a seller to accept an offer.

What happens after a seller accepts your offer?

If both the buyer and the seller sign a purchase agreement, it becomes legally binding. That means you’re now under contract. Learn more about what happens after a seller accepts your offer.

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Posted in Buying a House