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13 Best FSBO Sites

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Best Paid FSBO Sites | Best Free FSBO Sites | Alternatives to FSBO Sites | FSBO Costs | FSBO vs. Realtor | FAQ

If you choose to sell your home for sale by owner (FSBO), you’ll likely need a FSBO service. These services provide tools to market your home, and some even give additional support during the sale process.

In this guide, we break down the pros and cons of the 13 best FSBO sites. We also examine the opportunities — and potential downsides — that come with for sale by owner sales overall.

If a DIY home sale seems complicated and overwhelming, you can get expert guidance from a real estate agent without paying the traditional 3% listing fee.

Clever Real Estate is a free service that pre-negotiates major savings on commission. Sellers who list with Clever pay just 1.5% in listing fees — that’s $6,000 in savings on a $400,000 home. Best of all, Clever’s nationwide network of real estate agents provide full service, so you can get the full benefits of working with a realtor at a fraction of the cost.

The average Clever seller saves $7,000. Learn more!

13 Best FSBO Sites: At a Glance

FSBO Site💰 Cost✅ Pros⛔ Cons
Fizber$0–395Deals and promotions can make the price cheaperObscured listing terms and services
Homecoin$0–3,000Cheap options, great MLS listing termsLimited availability, extras can add up
ISoldMyHouse.com$299–399Easy to use, widely availableLimited add-ons
FSBO.com$99.95–399.95Easy to use, widely availableExpensive, limited add-ons
Beycome$99–499 + 1%Cheap, good customer service1% Concierge option is a bad deal
Redfin$95–100Cheap, widely availableAvailable only through Fizber and FSBO.com
Flat Fee GroupVaries, typically $199–499Some state brokers have good rates and servicesSome state brokers cover several states or have high fees
Landflip$80–300/monthGood for specialty properties (like farms, ranches, and commercial lots)Monthly fee instead of flat fee cost
Circa My Old House$45Good for awesome old housesYou need a showstopper to benefit from it’s social media marketing
ZillowFreePopular site, automatically lists to Trulia tooFSBO homes are harder for buyers to find
Facebook MarketplaceFreeGood for sharing a listing with family, friends, and neighborsLimited audience, privacy concerns
ForSaleByOwner.comFreeIts audience is FSBO home buyersNo MLS listing, frequent service changes
CraigslistFreeEasy to useOutdated website, attracts scammers
Show more

» MOREBest Niche for Sale by Owner Sites

The 9 Best Paid FSBO Websites

#1 Fizber

💰 How much does Fizber cost?
OptionsCostIncludes
Fizber listingFreeFizber listing
Digital Boost$95FSBO listing on Redfin
MLS Boost$295MLS listing, 6-month listing term, 6 photos
Premium MLS boost$395MLS listing, 6-month listing term, 25+ photos
Show more

  • 👍 What we like: Great customer service, deals may be available
  • 👎 What we dislike: Unclear listing terms, outdated website

Fizber is a flat fee MLS company that operates nationwide. Its customer service is fantastic, and you could snag a great deal.

In your state, Fizber may have discounts, promotions, and better FSBO listing terms than it advertises on its site. Some states offer longer listing terms and more than 6–25 photos. To see what Fizber offers in your area, contact its customer service via webchat or email.

Fizber’s downside is its website, which has outdated information and isn’t as clean as ISoldMyHouse.com’s.

#2 Homecoin

💰 How much does Homecoin cost?
OptionsCostIncludes
Homecoin.com listingFreeUnlimited photos, video tour links
Flat fee MLS listing$95MLS listing, 12-month listing term, maximum photos 
Show more

  • 👍 What we like: Cheap, lots of add-ons available
  • 👎 What we dislike: Limited availability

Homecoin’s paid option is just $95 — but it’s only available in California, Florida, Georgia, Minnesota, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia.

If you know exactly what you need, Homecoin can be a great one-stop shop. Unlike other flat fee MLS listing companies, Homecoin doesn’t offer packages. Instead, it offers an MLS listing with à la carte add-ons. These add-ons include photography, yard signs, lockboxes, and open house kits.

However, if you need a lot of services, the add-ons can get expensive. At that point, you might be better off with a full-service realtor who offers lower rates.

#3 ISoldMyHouse.com

💰 How much does ISoldMyHouse.com cost?
OptionsCostIncludes
Get Listed$299MLS listing, 6-month listing term, 6–10 photos, FSBO listing on ISoldMyHouse.com
Get Sold$399MLS listing, 6-month listing term, 25+ photos, FSBO listing on ISoldMyHouse.com
Show more

  • 👍 What we like: Clean, easy to navigate website with clearly defined services 
  • 👎 What we dislike: Not the best price, limited add-ons

ISoldMyHouse.com is a flat fee MLS listing service with a streamlined, easy-to-use website. Its add-ons are limited but easy to understand, and it’s available in every state but North Dakota. Its site also has a small learning center, which could be useful for selling for sale by owner.

ISoldMyHouse.com’s prices are average, and its MLS listing options don’t come with extra support. If you need help pricing your home or other services, consider using a different FSBO site or a that offers full service.

#4 FSBO.com

💰 How much does FSBO.com cost?
OptionsCostIncludes
FSBO package$99.95FSBO.com listing, FSBO listing on Redfin
MLS package$399.95MLS listing, 6-month listing term, 20 photos in most states
Show more

  • 👍 What we like: A simple, easy-to-use website that’s clear and available in 49 states. 
  • 👎 What we dislike: Not the cheapest option, add-ons are limited and on a per-state basis

FSBO.com is a flat fee MLS listing service that’s available in every state but North Dakota. If you’re looking for a simple way to get on the MLS, we recommend the $399.95 MLS package. You get about 20 photos of your home and a six-month listing term.

FSBO.com also has its own store for yard signs and state-specific legal forms, which may be useful for your for sale by owner journey.

But its services vary by state. Some states have add-ons like lockboxes, extra photos, or same-day MLS entry, while some don’t have any add-ons. And some of the add-ons are more expensive than they should be.

#5 Beycome

💰 How much does Beycome cost?
OptionsCostIncludes
Basic$99Beycom.com FSBO listing, MLS listing, maximum listing term, maximum photos
Enhanced$299Professional photo shoot, lockbox, yard sign, brochures, flyers
Show more

  • 👍 What we like: Lots of value for the price
  • 👎 What we dislike: Only available in certain states, Concierge service not recommended

Beycome is a flat fee MLS company available in Alabama, California, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Minnesota, North Carolina, and South Carolina.

The company offers a $99 package with maximum MLS photos and a listing term that lasts until your house sells. That’s a fantastic price for what you get. Its Enhanced package includes some great extras, like a pro photography shoot and unlimited listing changes. However, this package isn’t available in California or Minnesota.

Beycome’s limited availability holds it back from being in our top three. And we don’t recommend its 1% Concierge service. It isn’t clear what this service includes, and you should know exactly what you’re getting for a 1% sales fee.

#6 Redfin

💰 How much does Redfin cost?
OptionsCostIncludes
Fizber’s Digital Boost$95FSBO Redfin listing, featured listing on Fizber.com
FSBO.com’s FSBO Package$99.956-month FSBO.com listing, Redfin listing
Show more

  • 👍 What we like: It’s a cheap way to get on a popular website
  • 👎 What we dislike: You don’t get on the MLS

You can get a FSBO listing on Redfin, but only through Fizber or FSBO.com. Fizber’s Digital Boost option and FSBO.com’s FSBO Package both come with a Redfin listing.

Of the two, we recommend going through FSBO.com. Its $100 package comes with a six-month FSBO.com listing, and it’s a more popular site than Fizber.

Your home will get exposure on Redfin’s popular site — but it won’t be listed on the MLS, where you’d get maximum exposure.

Redfin’s FSBO listings are marked as for sale by owner and can include your phone number. They’re available in most markets, but you’ll want to check your ZIP code for coverage.

» MORE: Read our review of Redfin’s discount brokerage service

#7 Flat Fee Group

💰 How much does Flat Fee Group cost?
OptionsCostIncludes
Varies by brokerVaries, typically $199–499Varies by broker
Show more

  • 👍 What we like: Some brokers have helpful options and good deals
  • 👎 What we dislike: Inconsistent, with some brokers charging high fees

Flat Fee Group isn’t a flat fee MLS company. Instead, it’s an organization of brokers. One broker can preside over one or more states. The services available in your area depend on your state’s broker.

Some brokers charge reasonable fees and have good listing terms. Others don’t. In Washington, the broker charges just $75 for a basic MLS listing with eight photos. But in Tennessee, the broker charges $499 for an MLS listing with 10 photos (plus some legal forms).

Compare Flat Fee Group’s offerings in your state with other best FSBO sites. Your state might not have the best deal, but your broker could be nearby and have some good options.

#8 Landflip

💰 How much does Landflip cost?
OptionsCostIncludes
Essential$80/mo.5 listings, 10 photos per listing
Premium$100/mo.50 listings, 25 photos per listing
Pro$150/mo.100 listings, 50 photos per listing
Pro+$300/mo.200+ listings, 50 photos per listing
Show more

  • 👍 What we like: Good for owners of specialty properties like ranches, undeveloped lots, and off-grid homes
  • 👎 What we dislike: Not good for traditional FSBO sellers, expensive for single property owners

FSBO sellers who have lots of land or unusual properties may want a non-traditional listing service. These types of properties require non-traditional buyers, and they’ll be looking on for sale by owner websites like Landflip.

Landflip’s FSBO listings are syndicated to Farmflip, Ranchflip, Lotflip, Auctionflip, and Commercialflip, which gets more eyes on your unique slice of real estate.

Landflip has an unusual pricing plan with monthly payments. That’s because most of its options are geared toward investors. For sale by owner sellers with a single, non-business property should use the Essential model.

#9 Circa Old Houses

💰 How much does Circa Old Houses cost?
OptionsCostIncludes
Unlimited Everything$4590-day listing, no photo limit, only 10 megabytes of space
Show more

  • 👍 What we like: Has a built-in audience for people who love old houses
  • 👎 What we dislike: You’ll need an impressive — and old — property to reap the benefits

If you have a house with cool history, posting on Circa Old Houses could get some extra eyes on your property. It costs $45 for a 90-day listing, but you won’t get on the local MLS.

Circa Old Houses will also post your home to its Facebook and Instagram pages, which have thousands of followers and are frequently updated.

And the company works with publications like Country Living Magazine and HGTV Magazine. Your home could show up there if you have a real showpiece.

The 4 Best Free FSBO Websites

#1 Zillow

  • 👍 What we like: Popularity, automatic listing on Trulia
  • 👎 What we dislike: FSBO homes are hidden behind extra filters

Zillow is the most popular real estate site in the U.S., and it allows FSBO sellers to create their own listing.

But Zillow makes FSBO listings harder to find on its site than listings with an agent. Prospective buyers have to click “Other Listings” to see FSBO homes. Also, your FSBO listing will have a prominent “Contact Agent” button, and your phone number will appear below the description in plain text.

Despite the drawbacks, using Zillow for a for sale by owner home is worth it for the potential views. Since Zillow owns Trulia, FSBO homes posted to Zillow automatically post to Trulia too.

🔎 LEARN: How to sell your FSBO on Zillow the right way

#2 Facebook Marketplace

  • 👍 What we like: Good for sharing your listing with friends, family, and neighbors
  • 👎 What we dislike: Limited audience, privacy concerns, questionable benefits for paid advertising

Facebook Marketplace real estate listings are free and easy to create. You can post your listing to local groups and share it through Facebook.

You can also pay to promote your listing, but we don’t recommend it. Facebook ads are meant for big businesses and local shops, not single-item sales.

Most, if not all, of your contact with prospective buyers will be through Facebook. You’ll probably have to deal with window-shoppers, and you may want to lock down the privacy settings for your personal profile.

#3 ForSaleByOwner.com

  • 👍 What we like: Has a built-in audience for FSBO home buyers
  • 👎 What we dislike: No MLS listing option, frequent service changes

ForSaleByOwner.com has been in business since 1999. It’s a popular FSBO website, receiving roughly 350,000 visitors per month. And it’s easy to use.

But ForSaleByOwner.com doesn’t post your listing to the local MLS, so most buyers won’t see it. There’s no harm in using its free listing service, but be sure to post elsewhere too.

The company offers some paid options, but they change frequently. One of its previous plans was a 3% sales commission, which is the same as using a traditional agent. If you need expert help, we recommend so you can get full service AND save money.

» JUMP TO: Best Alternatives to FSBO Sites

#4 Craigslist

  • 👍 What we like: Well-known website for real estate listings, simple to use
  • 👎 What we dislike: Outdated website, attracts investors

Craigslist is one of the oldest and most well-known for sale by owner sites for real estate listings. The website is old and clunky, but creating a Craigslist post is simple.

The site is popular with real estate investors and flippers, so you may get low-ball offers. But if you have a home that needs some work and you want to sell as-is, this could be a good place to field offers.

Just watch out for scammers. Most scams on Craigslist target renters, but there are a few that target homeowners.

The Best Alternatives to FSBO Sites

Selling for sale by owner is a tough and time-consuming process, which is why a lot of FSBO sellers ultimately go with an agent.

We recommend selling for sale by owner only if you’re very familiar with the selling process. If you aren’t an investor or real estate expert, you’ll likely have an easier (and potentially more lucrative) sale by using a discount broker or even an iBuyer.

Discount Brokers

CompanyListing Fee
Clever Real Estate1.5%
Redfin1.5%
Ideal Agent2%
Show more

Discount real estate brokers offer the services as a traditional real estate agent at discounted rates. For most sellers, we recommend Clever. But we also advise all sellers to shop around for the brokerage that best meets their needs.

#1 Clever Real Estate

  • 👍 What we like: Nationwide availability, multiple agent matches, low commission fees
  • 👎 What we dislike: Lower-priced homes ($200,000 or less) won’t benefit from the savings 

Clever Real Estate is our top pick for the best discount real estate broker. Clever can match you with top local agents from trusted brokerages like Keller Williams, RE/MAX and Coldwell Banker — for just a 1.5% listing fee. On a $400,000 home sale, that translates to $6,000 in savings!

» MORE: Read our full Clever review

Unlike other brokers, Clever can match you with several agents to compare. Its service is free, with no obligation to commit. So if you don’t think selling with Clever is right for you, you can head right back to selling FSBO.

🤑 Try Clever for free and save THOUSANDS in commission fees! 🤑

#2 Redfin

  • 👍 What we like: 1.5% listing fee
  • 👎 What we dislike: 1% fee is possible, but you have to buy with a Redfin agent

Redfin is our #2 pick for best discount broker. It covers most major markets and has a 1.5% listing fee. You can get that fee down to 1% if you also buy with a Redfin agent. That’s an extra hoop you might not want to go through, especially if you already have a buyer’s agent.

While Redfin advertises a flat commission rate, it charges minimum fees that vary by location. The fees range from $2,000 to $7,000, with an average of $3,350.

Redfin also uses a team-based model to make its process more efficient. This model works, but it means its agents have a higher volume of clients and there’s a higher chance for miscommunication or mix-ups.

» MORERead our full Redfin review

#3 Ideal Agent

  • 👍 What we like: 2% listing fee, high-quality agents
  • 👎 What we dislike: Not the lowest listing fee, small network

Ideal Agent is an agent matching service that offers a 2% listing fee. This rate is decent but not as competitive as other services offer.

The company has some of the highest standards for agents in its network. All of its agents are in the top 1% of their respective markets.

However, Ideal Agent has a small network of about 2,000 realtors. It’s available nationwide, but its agent selection may be limited in rural areas. Also, Ideal Agent sometimes responds unprofessionally to negative online reviews.

» MORE: Read our full Ideal Agent review

iBuyers

CompanyService Fee
Opendoor5%
Offerpad6%
Show more

iBuyers are companies that make all-cash offers on houses and can close within two weeks.

The downsides are that iBuyers:

  • Operate only in select areas
  • Have strict criteria for the houses they buy
  • Charge service fees and make deductions for repairs that lower your sale price

iBuyers are a great alternative for some FSBO sellers. But for most sellers, we recommend using a low commission brokerage.

If you want to research iBuyers, consider these top two options from the iBuyer companies we vetted.

#1 Opendoor

  • 👍 What we like: Operates in many markets, no cancellation fee
  • 👎 What we dislike: You won’t get top dollar for your sale

Opendoor can make you an offer in 24 hours and close as fast as 14 days. 

The company charges a 5% service fee and operates in more areas than Offerpad. Currently, Opendoor is available in 45 markets.

Eligible homes must be:

  • Single-family homes or townhouses (duplexes and condos are accepted in certain markets)
  • Valued between $100,000 and $600,000 (or as high as $1.4 million in some markets)
  • On a maximum lot size of 2 acres (or 1–1.5 acres in some markets)
  • Built after 1930

Unlike Offerpad, there’s no cancellation fee if you decide to drop the deal before closing. 

#2 Offerpad

  • 👍 What we like: Fast closing times
  • 👎 What we dislike: Cancellation fee, you won’t get top dollar for your sale

Offerpad can make you an offer in 24 hours and can close in just eight days in some markets.

Offerpad has a 6% service fee. It operates in 22 markets in Alabama, Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Missouri, Nevada, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas.

Eligible homes must be:

  • Single-family properties, including condos and townhomes
  • Built after 1960
  • Valued at less than $1 million
  • On a lot size less than 1 acre

Offerpad has a 1% cancellation fee if you don’t cancel within four days after the inspection. That’s a high fee, so be sure to make a decision within that time frame.

» MORE: Compare Offerpad to how much you could earn on the open market

How Much Are FSBO Costs?

FSBO sellers don’t have to pay a listing fee, but they still pay for:

  • The buyer’s agent commission
  • Closing costs
  • Real estate attorney fees
  • Marketing and listing costs
  • The appraisal
  • Home preparation

Usually these costs are a minimum of $4,000.

FSBO services, which help you market and list your home, vary widely in price. You could pay $0 or up to $3,000. This cost includes listing your home on a regional multiple listing service (MLS) or, in the case of free FSBO websites, listing your home on a website that markets FSBO homes.

» MORE: How Much Does It Cost to Sell a House by Owner?

Even if you pay top dollar for a premium FSBO service, you still have to handle paperwork, showings, negotiations, and more on your own.

If you want more for your money, we recommend using Clever Real Estate. Clever can connect you with a top local agent who offers a 1.5% listing fee — half the typical seller’s commission. Your agent will handle most of the sale process for you and help you sell for top dollar.

Should You Sell FSBO or Hire a Real Estate Agent?

FSBO costs are generally less than what you’d pay a traditional agent — but the catch is that FSBO sellers usually earn less from their home sales. 

Sellers typically pay 2.5–3% of the home sale price to their listing agent. For a $450,000 home sale, a traditional 3% listing fee would be $13,500. That’s a lot of cash, and that’s a very tempting reason to sell FSBO.

FSBO sellers usually try to save by cutting out the seller’s agent commission altogether. (They still need to pay the standard 2.5–3% buyer’s agent commission, since no agent will work for free.)

But these savings don’t make up for the reality that FSBO homes tend to sell for less than agented homes. A National Association of Realtors study found that FSBO homes sold for about 18% less than agented homes, while real estate analytic product company Collateral Analytics found that FSBO homes sold for 5.5% less on average. 

That’s a wide gap, but both studies suggest you’ll get significantly more money with an agent — and that the lost proceeds vastly outweigh the 2.5–3% savings you would get from ditching the seller’s agent commission.

👋 Need a great agent?

If you're weighing your options for buying or selling a house, Clever can help! With our friends at Clever:  ✅ You'll only pay 1.5% to list your home ✅ In eligible states, you'll get cash back when you buy a home ✅ You'll work with a full-service realtor from a top broker, like RE/MAX or Keller Williams Saving on realtor fees doesn't have to mean sacrificing service. Find a top local agent today!

FAQ about the Best FSBO Websites

What is the MLS, and why should my home be on it?

MLS stands for multiple listing service. There are hundreds of local MLS throughout the U.S. Sites like Zillow, Realtor.com, Redfin, and Trulia pull listings from the MLS. 

Only real estate agents, brokers, and companies with licenses can post on the MLS. FSBO sellers have to pay a flat fee MLS company to get their home on the MLS.

Your MLS listing will feature a listing broker’s contact information. The broker will forward leads and inquiries to you so you can communicate with buyers yourself.

Can I get my for sale by owner home on Trulia?

You can get a FSBO home on Trulia by posting a FSBO listing to Zillow. Zillow owns Trulia and will automatically pull your Zillow FSBO listing to Trulia. Posting a FSBO home listing to Zillow is free — but you’ll want to consider the trade-offs first.

What are the best paid for sale by owner websites?

The best paid FSBO sites are Fizber, Homecoin, and ISoldMyHouse.com. But, depending on your needs, you may find another paid FSBO service better for your upcoming home sale. Use Home Bay’s in-depth research to compare your options!

What are the best free FSBO sites?

Zillow is the best free website to list your FSBO home for free followed by Facebook Marketplace, ForSaleByOwner.com and Craigslist. We recommend posting to all four to maximize the amount of views for your FSBO sale, especially if you don’t intend on paying a flat fee service to get on the MLS. Learn more.

🔎 Methodology

Our in-house team of real estate experts spent hundreds of hours researching the best FSBO sites. 

Different services required a variety of approaches. But in general we:

  • ✅ Vetted customer service: We looked for responsiveness, knowledge, and friendliness. We also factored in pushiness (a big negative). This process involved emails, phone calls, web chats, and messages through social media.
  • ✅ Considered user experience: We thoroughly browsed for sale by owner websites, looking for easy-to-use and clear services. Obscured costs and hidden fees were major red flags.
  • ✅ Read the fine print: We checked their terms of services for refund policies and other contractual details. 
  • ✅ Dug into business models: We identified how these companies operate (i.e., do they farm you out to other brokerages, or do they take care of you?)
  • ✅ Crunched the numbers: We compared pricing for comparable services to see where you’ll get the most value for your money.
  • ✅ Considered accessibility: If service areas are limited to a few states, it was reflected as slightly negative in our ranking. 
  • ✅ Looked for social proof: We evaluated online customer reviews for common positive and negative feedback.

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